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Crimes & Injuries Archives

PoliceBrutalityIf someone wants to sue the police for brutality or the excessive use of force, that person has to file a civil lawsuit. We’re going to take a closer look at what that lawsuit process typically looks like.

Police Conduct and Immunity

If you are considering suing the police for brutality or misconduct, you need to understand the idea of qualified immunity. Generally speaking, police officers cannot be sued for the actions they take while on the job as long as they perform their duties within reasonable bounds. If this happens, you cannot successfully file a lawsuit against the police or the organization that employed them. This immunity is designed to allow police to do their jobs without the constant worry of being sued for anything and everything they do.

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AssaultPersonal injury cases not only arise out of situations involving negligent actions, but also intentional actions, such as assault and battery. In an assault and battery personal injury case, one person intentionally threatens to harm, or actually does harm, someone else without the victim’s consent. When this happens, the victim can sue the person who intentionally inflicted the harm for assault, battery, or both. Assault and battery tort cases can be a little confusing to those who don’t have a legal background. So, to help clarify many of the issues involved and explain what an assault and battery case is all about, let’s take a look at some commonly asked questions.

What is an assault?

An assault is an intentional threat to commit violence against another person. When someone assaults someone else, the aggressor threatens the victim with physical bodily harm. This threat, or action, has to be intentional, and must not only be aimed at causing the victim to actually feel fear or apprehension of being hurt, but must also result in the victim experiencing that fear.

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